History of Kyokushin

The founder of Kyokushinkai (Japanese Association of the Seekers of the Supreme Truth) was the Japanese Masutatsu Oyama (1927 - 1994). The life of this man was extraordinary and not only because he completely dedicated it to the self-improvement and popularization of modern martial arts in its spiritual and physical aspects. Noteworthy, for example, is the fact that in 1945 Oyama joined the suicide squad (kamikaze), wanting to give his life for his beloved homeland - because that's what he said about Japan. He was saved from death by the end of hostilities. The personality of this man is confirmed by the fact that he was called "The Last Samurai" during his lifetime. As was written in one of the most prestigious magazines dedicated to the Far Eastern martial arts "Black Belt":"Oyama not only took over the toughest Bushido ideal (the code of ethics of samurai), but went a step further. He pointed out that the degree of sacrifice: self-denial through self-discipline is directly proportional to the degree of success. Karate fight, when there is a firearm in the world, is no longer essential at the time of the wars, it seems archaic. However, the discipline of Budo remains in the hearts of the continuators of the Samurai art. "

In 1936, Masutatsu Oyama won a master class in Chinese martial art called kempo, and as a 17-year-old university student at Takushoku he passed a karate 2 nd exam that he coached with the most eminent master of that time, Gichin Funakoshi. He also had 4 dan in judo. In 1947, after winning the universe championship in Kyoto, Oyama decided to devote his life entirely to this far-eastern martial art. Modeling himself on the Buddhist monk Nichiren, who spent many years in a strenuous training, the Japanese went alone to the top of Kiyosumi. In solitary conditions, for 18 months he improved his skills in the art of karate and also in Zen. After returning from the mountains, he was the only one in the history of karate to decide to duel with a bull. He was convinced that such a fight would show how far he had perfected his mental and physical skills. The clash with the animal took place in Chiba and ended with the victory of Oyama. The bull was killed by one punch between the eyes.

The creator of Kyokushin decided to promote his karate around the world. He was sure that it is not only a martial art, but above all a carrier of the Far East tradition and culture - ethical values ​​proclaimed by Confucius and Lao-Tse. Oyama always told his students that karate begins and ends with kindness and that while physical development is the beginning of this martial art, spiritual development is the ultimate goal. For better visibility of the ethical principles of kyokushin, the Japanese have created a seven-point moral code for this martial art. It talks about the obligation to respect the elderly and parents, striving for physical and spiritual perfection and refraining from violence.

with the victory of Oyama. The bull was killed by one punch between the eyes. The creator of Kyokushin decided to promote his karate around the world. He was sure that it is not only a martial art, but above all a carrier of the Far East tradition and culture - ethical values ​​proclaimed by Confucius and Lao-Tse. Oyama always told his students that karate begins and ends with kindness and that while physical development is the beginning of this martial art, spiritual development is the ultimate goal. For better visibility of the ethical principles of kyokushin, the Japanese have created a seven-point moral code for this martial art. It talks about the obligation to respect the elderly and parents, striving for physical and spiritual perfection and refraining from violence. In 1952, Masutatsu Oyama left for the United States, where he gave numerous kyokushin art shows for 11 months. Among other things, he fought several duels with bulls. After one of them, one of America's most prestigious newspapers, The New York Time, called it "The Divine Hand". The Japanese claimed that in the fight you can easily defeat even an 800-kg bull, under one condition - you must not be afraid of him. Oyama's numerous travels around the world have made kyokushin very popular in a short time. Currently, it is grown by over 2 million people around the globe.

In 1974, the International Kyokushin Organization awarded Masutatsu Oyama the highest degree of initiation in the art of karate - 9 dan, and then 10. "The Last Samurai" was the author of a dozen or so books devoted to karate: "What is karate?" (1958), "Here is karate" (1965), "Dynamics of karate" (1966), "Fighting Spirit" (1972), "Kyokushin Road" (1976) and others.

1923 Masutatsu Oyama is coming into the world.
1936 Young Oyama wins the black belt in Kempo.
1940 Oyama gets 2 Dan in Shotokan karate.
1946 M.Oyama is promoted to Gogo Ryu Karate at 4 Dan from the hands of Gogen Yamaguchi.
1947 Oyama becomes the Japanese champion in the Open Japan Championship.
1948 M.Oyama decides to go to the mountains where during his 18-month stay he improves his skills.
1950 Oyama rolls the first duel with a bull in Chiba.
1952 Oyama goes to USA for 11 months where he popularizes karate.
1953 Open field Dojo in Meijiro (Tokyo) led by Shihandai Kenji Mizushima.
1954 A sign of Oyama -Dojo is hanged. The sessions are led by Mizushima and Yasuda.
1956 From Okinawa begins Oyama's journey through South-East Asia to learn about different styles of combat. A new Dojo is created near Rikkyo University. It becomes the nucleus of Kyokushinkai and karate based on the principles: after 1000 days beginners, after 10,000 days - the first insight into the secrets ..
1957 Trips to Europe and the USA. After fighting with a bull in Mexico, Oyama goes to the hospital for six months.
1958 The book "What is Karate" is published - the bestseller. Oyama goes to Hokkaido to fight the bear. The fight is unsuccessful. The first branch in Hawaii.
1959 The first tournament in Hawaii. Another Oyama trip to the USA and Europe.
1960 Second tournament in Hawaii. There are already 73 branches in 16 countries in the world.
1961 Opening of the San Francisco and Los Angeles Dojo. The first tournament in the USA. Oyama the main judge.
1962 Oyama's journey back to Europe and the USA. People from abroad appear in the Japanese Dojo.
1963 Trips to America, Europe and South Africa. Beginning of construction of Honbu Kyokushinkai in Tokyo.
1964 Thai-boxing challenges the Japanese karate challenge, which is rejected. Then Dojo Oyama sends T. Nakamura and two other players to Bangkok. They win two of three fights. The official opening of Honbu in Tokyo and the founding of the International Karate Organization.
1965 "This is Karate" appears, which becomes the Kyokushinkai bible (3000 typewritten pages were written for this book, and 20,000 photos were taken).
1966 K. Kurosaki teaches in Europe. American organizations are created. Sean Connery gets kyokushin karate lessons in Japan.
1968 A European and Middle Eastern organization is established. Oyama gives lessons to the King of Jordan.
1969 A South African and Southeast Asian organization is established. The first open tournament of all styles in Tokyo. The first three places for Kyokushin players:
1. T.Yamazaki,
2. Y.Soeno,
3. K.Hasagawa.
1970 The second open tournament in Japan (kumite, tameshiwari). The Kyokushin contestants win:
1. Hasagawa,
2. Yamazaki,
3. Soeno.
1971 The third tournament opened in Japan. The Kyokushin contestants win:
1. K.Sato,
2. Y.Oyama,
3. D.Osihi.
1972 Oyama meets the king and queen of Spain. The fourth open tournament in Japan. Kyokushin Triumph:
1. M. Miura,
2. H.Collins,
3. T.Sato.
On the basis of Oyama's autobiography, the film "Kenka Karate" is created.
1973 The fifth open karate tournament in Japan:
1. H. Ryoyam,
2. T.Yamazaki,
3. T.Sato.
1974 Kancho receives IX dan. Sixth tournament opened in Japan. And the Polish Championships in Kyokushin.
1975 And World Open Tournament In Tokyo. Participation was taken by a team of 5 people from Poland. K. Sato wins.
1976 The documentary film "Strongest Karate" is released. In Japan, there is a 8 karate tournament. The winner is T.Sato. In Krakow, the 1st International Karate Tournament takes place for the Wawel Dragon Cup.
1980 The 2nd World Open Tournament in Tokyo (the Pole J. Poznański takes part in it).
1981 13 Open Tournament in Japan.
1982 2nd European Championships in London. IV International Tournament for the Dragon's Wawel Cup.
1984 Third World Tournament in Tokyo. Poles do not take part.
1985 3rd European Championships in Barcelona. 17. Open tournament in Japan. At the invitation of Oyama, A. Drewniak comes to Japan.
1986 18 Open Karate tournament in Japan. International Tournament in Katowice.
1987 14th Polish Championships in Łódź. 4th European Championship in Katowice. IV. World Tournament in Tokyo. A. Matsui wins.
1988 European Cup Oyama Cup in Budapest.
1989 V European Championship in Budapest.
1990 Kyokushin Karate International Tournament in West Berlin
1991 VI European Championship in Spain. V. World Tournament in Tokyo. K.Midori wins.
1991 VI European Championship in Spain. V World Tournament in Tokyo. K.Midori wins.
1993 7th European Championship in Bulgaria. Twentieth jubilee Polish Championship. European Cup in Katowice.
1994.04.27 Masutatsu Oyama dies. His successor is Akyoshi Matsui. Competitive Kyokushi Karate organizations are created. However, ultimately the strongest is the org.A.Matsui. Many masters leave and form their own organizations.
1994 8th European Championships in Lille.
1995 The 9th European Championships in Bucharest (Romania).
VI World Tournament in Tokyo - Dadzibug in 9th place.
1996 European Championship in Volos (Greece).
1997 XI Master of Europe in Gdansk. Weighing World Championships. P. Sawicki World Champion, E. Pawlikowska the World Champion, L. Zgrzebniak the runner-up.
1998 European Cup in Bergen (Norway). Team World Cup in Paris. Sensational performance of Polish players. Inter-national Championships in Warsaw